A Little Bit Different

A Little Bit Different
Posted on Thu 21 Jan 2021

Written by Makybe Neru

Where it all started

My life didn’t start just like every other normal child. I was faced with a bit of a hurdle from the beginning. I was a very happy baby, wanting to crawl everywhere around the house. It wasn’t until I was about one when my Mum started to see something was not right with me, I couldn’t stand on my own and couldn’t walk. That's when my Mum and Dad decided to take me to see a specialist.

Finding out some news

We had to visit a specialist in regards to what was going on with me. We were sent away from the specialist to get a lot of tests done which included a nerve conduction study, blood tests and a MRI. We found out that I was born with Ataxic Cerebral palsy, which is why I couldn’t walk. I had to use a walking frame to support me while I learnt how to walk. This was frustrating because I was watching the other kids run around. Although the other kids weren't mean to me at all, they were all very kind and nice to me always letting me try and join in with their games.

Growing and Walking

Growing older and getting use to having my walking frame, it was time to strengthen my legs and throw that walking frame away!! I first had to stretch my calf muscle by having serial casting for 10 weeks. I then had to do lots of physio, I got a lot of help from some awesome people that helped me to become stronger and able to walk by myself. It took a while but I did it. Although now I could walk and feel confident there was still some things going on that I couldn't change, l was asking myself why can’t I smile? Why can’t I close my eyes? We found out that I had a damaged right facial nerve that was affecting my face which was making it hard to show expression on one side of my face, but that didn’t change who I am today. 

Read Makybe's full story here 

Today Makybe is thriving at school and challenging himself to climb Mount Kosciuszko as part of the Krazy Kosci Klimb. Show him your support and help him reach his goal.

Your support of the Krazy Kosci Klimb will provide essential funding for the Accessible Gym and Sports Program at Cerebral Palsy Alliance.

Ella received a Telepractice Support Kit, thanks to a grant from the City of Newcastle during the COVID-19 crisis. 

Researchers from The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Australian Catholic University and The University of Melbourne are doing a study to find out parents’ perspectives of their child’s scoliosis surgery.


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