Current grant recipients

In the 2018/2019 grant round, Our Grants Program awarded more than $8 million in project grants, career development grants and other grants to researchers across the globe.

Are you a researcher?

Each year we invest millions of dollars in a range of cerebral palsy research projects in Australia and overseas. Find out how our Grants program can help start or progress your project.
Applications for the 2019/2020 grant round open in September 2019.

Grant recipients 2019/2020

Mrs Carly Luke

The University of Queensland

PhD research grant (PHD02619)
AU$ 105,000.00
Early Detection of Indigenous infants at risk of Neurodevelopmental Disability and relationship to motor and cognitive outcomes at 12 months

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Indigenous infants are more likely to be diagnosed with a neurodevelopmental disability including Cerebral Palsy (CP) and Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) than non-Indigenous infants.

Many Indigenous Australians live in rural and remote areas, impacting their ability to access health services and trained clinicians to enable early assessment of their infant, delaying diagnosis. This delay impacts the infant’s ability to access services that provide intervention aimed at improving overall development.

The aim of this study is to implement the early screening of Indigenous infants to identify those ‘at risk’ of adverse Neurodevelopmental outcomes and, to determine the impact of perinatal factors and caregiver’s mental health status on development, in infants from rural and remote Queensland.

The study will screen 150 infants over 2 years (2020-2021), aged 0-9 months corrected age whose families identify as having an Indigenous background and included risk factors. They will be referred by health professionals or community workers using the early detection networks our team have established in North Queensland.

Infants eligible for screening will be those with one or more parents identifying as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander with, pregnancy complications, born preterm, or term with history of neurological risk factors, or post-natal complications.

Infants recruited to the study will be screened with gold-standard assessments used for detecting ‘high risk’ of cerebral palsy or neurodevelopmental disability, by local clinicians or remotely by the use of technology (smart phone applications, video-conferencing) with assistance from trained local community workers.

At 12 months corrected age, infants will complete assessments which look at their overall development, movement, learning and communication (2021-2022).

This study aims to decrease the age of diagnosis of Indigenous infants to allow them to access intervention services to promote improved developmental and health outcomes for the child and family.

Miss Ingrid Dudink

Monash University

PhD research grant (PHD00819)
AU$ 35,000.00
Does antenatal lactoferrin promote connectivity of the growth restricted brain?

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Fetal Growth Restriction (FGR) is a common complication of pregnancy, present in up to 9% of pregnancies in Australia. FGR describes the fetus that has failed to grow to its full potential and is associated with learning and behavioural deficits later in life and motor dysfunction including cerebral palsy. FGR is largely caused by poor placental function, termed placental insufficiency, restricting the amount of oxygen and nutrient supply to the developing fetus. Chronic hypoxia describes a period of prolonged lack of oxygen, which has profound detrimental effects on the growing fetal brain, with FGR infants at high risk of brain injury and cerebral palsy.

Pre-clinical data and human MRI studies show FGR disrupts connectivity of the major cells of the brain, the neurons. Fundamentally, altered brain connectivity results in a reduction in cell-to-cell connections between neurons. There are currently no neuroprotective therapies available for pregnancies with suspected FGR. For the development of a targeted therapy, it is integral we understand the progression of fetal brain injury in FGR. This project aims to characterise the progression of brain injury in FGR, not done before, by examining the normal and abnormal development of neurons in ovine pregnancies affected by placental insufficiency and subsequent FGR.

Lactoferrin is a protein that derives its name from the high concentrations found in breastmilk. Pilot evidence suggests antenatal administration of lactoferrin will be neuroprotective to the brain of growth restricted offspring. We propose that a simple dietary supplementation of lactoferrin given to mum during pregnancy will normalise brain development in FGR fetuses and reduce long-term neurological deficits associated with FGR. As a therapy, lactoferrin is simple to administer, safe, inexpensive and could be readily adopted into routine clinical care anywhere in the world. This project will examine whether antenatal treatment of lactoferrin improves brain connectivity in FGR.

Dr Tasneem Karim

The University of Sydney

PhD research grant (PHD02119)
AU$ 35,000.00
Cerebral palsy (CP) in Bangladesh: towards developing a national CP register, surveillance, early diagnosis and interventions for children with CP in low resource setting

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Cerebral palsy (CP), the most common cause of childhood disability, is estimated to be nearly 5 to 10 times more prevalent in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Yet the exact burden of CP in LMICs is largely unknown and the causal pathway is also likely to be different from high-income countries.

Early diagnostic and intervention techniques designed for developed countries may not be appropriate for LMICs. Moreover, diagnosis is delayed and this poses a complex challenge in program development as early diagnosis is the key to early intervention.

This study will i) describe the burden of CP in a typical LMIC, Bangladesh, through a population based register ii) assess the use of a novel method for early diagnosis and iii) assess the outcome of a parents led early intervention and rehabilitation program for children with CP, all of which is essential for evidence based program development in LMIC settings.

Ms Amanda Spirit-Jones

The University of Sydney

PhD research grant (PHD03119)
AU$ 35,000.00
Intensive Early Active Treatment (I-EAT) program for feeding and swallowing in infants at high risk of cerebral palsy

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Cerebral palsy (CP) impacts the way a person can control and coordinate their muscles, including muscles of the mouth and throat, which can impact the safety and efficiency of feeding and swallowing. This is called dysphagia. Dysphagia affects 85% of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and can lead to a range of secondary impairments including failure to thrive, malnutrition, which can further impair neurological and musculoskeletal development, and it can result in aspiration pneumonia; a leading cause of death in CP. A strong need, therefore, exists for evidence-based feeding interventions. To date, the quality of evidence is insufficient to make judgements on best practice in treating dysphagia in this population.

Motor learning and neural plasticity evidence proposes that intense, early practise of the desired skill in motivating, functional activities have the best results. Recent research is showing that motor learning interventions are having positive results for advancing gross and fine motor skills in infants with cerebral palsy, and speech in children with apraxia of speech and swallowing with adults who have had a stroke.

This pilot randomised controlled trial study compares Intensive Early Adaptive Treatment (I-EAT) program to standard care to understand whether oral feeding difficulties, reliance on compensatory strategies and secondary impairments can be reduced in infants with CP. We will establish the feasibility and acceptability of both interventions in addition to monitoring their impact on oral intake, oral feeding efficiency, feeding and swallowing skills, health, growth and family stress.

Alongside the intervention arm of this study, we are determining the feasibility of three new infant feeding assessments; ultrasound, fibreoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and the Dysphagia Disorders Survey for Infants.

We are in the data collection phase of this study after commencing recruitment in February 2019. We aim to recruit 70 infants by 2022.

Mr Mahmudul Hassan Al Imam

CSF Global, Bangladesh

Training grant (CTT00119)
AU$ $4,010.00
General Movement Assessment (GMA) Training

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Findings from our research (i.e. Bangladesh Cerebral Palsy Register (BCPR)) suggest that the diagnosis of CP is delayed in rural Bangladesh compared to high income countries (5.2 years vs. 17 months in Australia).

Currently I am working as the Research Physiotherapist at CSF Global Bangladesh and enrolled into a PhD program through CQ University, Australia. My research and clinical practice are aimed to foster early diagnosis of CP in rural and remote settings of Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) like Bangladesh.

Training on GMA will be a great learning opportunity for me to ensure early diagnosis and intervention for children with CP in rural Bangladesh.

Dr Louisa Mudawarima

University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences

Training grant (CTT00319)
AU$ $3,100.00
General Movement Assessment (GMA) Training

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As a Co-Investigator and only local neurodevelopmental paediatrician on the Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation funded project “Neonatal resuscitation and impact on newborn survival, fresh stillbirth and rates of cerebral palsy and adverse neurodevelopmental outcome,” it is imperative that I be formally trained the Prechtl’s General Movements Assessment.

The GMA is critical to validate the feasibility and acceptability of this tool in this low-resourced context. This training will improve my skills in the early detection of cerebral palsy and improve early detection of and intervention for cerebral palsy in Zimbabwe, both clinically and in the research context.

Dr Trinh Quang Dung

National Children’s Hospital, Vietnam

Training grant (CTT00419)
AU$ $4,350.00
Increasing capacity for accurate, early diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy in Infants in Vietnam using the General Movements Assessment

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I am an experienced Paediatrician and Head of the Rehabilitation Department at the National Children’s Hospital (NCH). We recently collected data on 800 children newly diagnosed cases of CP in our unit, over a 5 month period, most of whom were under 2 years. There’s evident need for early recognition to enable early intervention and to optimise clinical outcomes in Vietnam where we are seeing a high burden of CP.

We’re interested in introducing the GMs assessment and evaluating it’s reliability and utility in Vietnam, and this opportunity will improve our department of rehabilitation in Hanoi.

A/Prof Nguyen Huu Chut

National Children’s Hospital, Vietnam

Training grant (CTT00619)
AU$ $4,350.00
Improving outcomes for children with Cerebral Palsy in Hanoi, Vietnam using accurate diagnosis and physical therapy

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I am an experienced physiotherapist and the Head Physiotherapist of the Rehabilitation Department at the National Children’s Hospital (NCH), Hanoi, Vietnam.

There is evident need for early diagnosis to enable early intervention and to optimise clinical outcomes in Vietnam where we are observing a high burden of CP. This course would provide me with invaluable skills to implement in our department in Hanoi.

Miss Linda Nguyen

McMaster University, Canada

Conference grant (CTT00819)
AU$ $4,637.00
Enhancing Research Skills to Build Career as a Rehabilitation Scientist

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Youth with disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, may experience challenges during the transition from pediatric to adult health care when they need to learn how to navigate new health care services.

My doctoral studies aims to understand the experiences of siblings with a brother or sister with a disability who are preparing for health care transition. My studies used an integrated knowledge translation approach to engage with siblings as research partners.

I developed the Sibling Youth Advisory Council (SibYAC) comprised of four young adults who have a brother or sister with a disability. I want to share my experiences from collaborating with the SibYAC, and will submit an oral presentation abstract at the European Academy of Childhood Disability Conference 2020 in Poznan, Poland. Then, I plan to spend a week in Utrecht, Netherlands to learn from the PERRIN PiP Study Group about strategies to engage with youth with cerebral palsy.

Mrs Samantha Stephens

Wollongong Hospital

Training grant (CTT00919)
AU$ $1,650.00
General Movement Assessment (GMA) Training

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I am the senior physiotherapist for our neonatal unit at Wollongong Hospital. I have worked at Wollongong Hospital in paediatrics in the senior role for over 20 years. We have babies at our unit who are 32 weeks and above in age. Many of our babies are transferred to our unit from other tertiary hospitals. We also have a very high number of babies with neonatal abstinence syndrome at our unit.

I do not have current training in General Movements Assessment and would like to attend the basic training so I can be an informed and valuable team member for our service and to better support parents when collecting these video assessments of babies on our unit. I would really appreciate the opportunity to attend training so that I can play an integral role in the early identification of babies at high risk of neurological dysfunction in our community.

Miss Shashini Soysa

Blacktown Mt Druitt hospital

Training grant (CTT01119)
AU$ $1,650.00
Training grant request for (BASIC) Prechtl’s Method of the Qualitative Assessment of General Movements

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I am a senior paediatric physiotherapist at Blacktown Mt Druitt Hospitals (BTMD) and have been seeking a chance to learn the GMA since the establishment of the CP guidelines in 2017, which noted its effectiveness in identifying very young infants at risk of CP.

I work primarily with newborns babies, born prematurely and at term. The ability to identify babies who are showing early signs of delayed development is crucial so that families can access early intervention to optimise developmental outcomes.

The current assessment tools I use are effective in identifying early signs of delayed development, but only in babies >6 months (e.g HINE). Undertaking training in the GMA will allow me to identify babies earlier (potentially 0-5m), which would allow earlier referrals and better health outcomes.

Ms Tayla Penny

The Ritchie Centre, Hudson Institute of Medical Research

Conference grant (CTT01219)
AU$ $4,000.00
12th Hershey Conference on Developmental Brain Injury

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Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury continues to be a major cause of mortality and morbidity in infants, and prevention of cerebral dysfunction in these children is of high importance.

The Hershey Conference on Developmental Brain Injury brings together an international group of leaders including esteemed scientists and clinicians from a variety of fields related to brain development and injury. The conference encourages presentations and discussion with young trainees to ensure our next group of leaders are presenting results in the field. The focus of the meeting is on finding new and better modes of intervention and neuroprotection for the developing brain.

Hershey is the only developmental brain conference in the world and is relevant to my PhD. By attending this conference, I will have the opportunity to share my research with distinguished professionals in the field, and gain feedback on my studies in preparation for submitting my thesis in late 2020.

Dr Katherine Benfer

The University of Queensland

Training grant (CTT02219)
AU$ $29,450.00
South Asian Alliance Implementation Symposium for early detection and intervention for infants at high risk of cerebral palsy

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This 8 day symposium will be held in Kolkata, India and unites multiple South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) nations in an evidence-based disability strategy which implements the first international clinical practice guideline (Novak 2017).

The symposium invites 40 health professionals from India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, Vietnam, Thailand, Sri Lanka and Pakistan.

We aim to financially support up to 20 participants to attend as funded scholarships. We will upskill local teams in early detection methods for cerebral palsy including General Movements assessment and Hammersmith Infant Neurological Evaluation and to foster research collaborations implementing early intervention programs such as the learning through everyday activities with parents (LEAP-CP) program. Supporting travel scholarships for health professionals in low-middle income countries will dramatically increase the accessibility of this specialist training. Candidates will be selected for leadership, academic research capacity and/or ability to implement early detection and early intervention programs in their countries/regions.

A/Prof Alicia Spittle

The University of Melbourne

Training grant (CTT02819)
AU$ $3,800.00
Training of Nepalese Health Professionals on Early Detection and Early Intervention for Infants with Cerebral Palsy

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The training grant will allow travel to Nepal in collaboration with the Nepal Physiotherapy Association and Kathmandu University to educate local health professionals, including doctors and physiotherapists, on how to implement early detection and early intervention for infants with cerebral palsy.

The training will involve practical workshops based upon international guidelines on best practice to accurately detect cerebral palsy (CP) in early infancy, along with early intervention strategies to maximise development of the child and their family. The training will be available to health professionals throughout Nepal, who will be given tools to implement changes into their own practice.

Resources for funding training are limited in Nepal and this training would not be possible without the support of the Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation.

Ms Joanna Butchart

Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

Travel grant (CTT03219)
AU$ $2,500.00
Identifying the training needs of therapists in Bangladesh through exploration of current practice and the cultural and contextual determinants

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The Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP), in Bangladesh, provides rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy. Learnings from a sabbatical of our colleague, highlighted the potential value of a team of Australian therapists providing training in goal directed therapy at CRP. In collaboration with the team at CRP, a qualitative research project was developed. We are requesting financial support for return flights/accommodation to Bangladesh to conduct two phases of the project.

Dr Eva Ibañez Medina

APAC, I.A.P. Asociación Pro Personas con Parálisis Cerebral (Association in Favor of People with Cerebral Palsy), Mexico

Conference grant (CTT03619)
AU$ $2,600.00
Implementation Of Early Detection And Intervention For Cerebral Palsy Conference

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This will be the third annual conference focusing on early detection and intervention of cerebral palsy. It includes workshops led by world renowned clinicians and researchers, and helps attendees turn theoretical knowledge into practice. The conference features debates from experts on state-of-the-art techniques and therapies.

I believe this conference will help strengthen our organization’s Detection and Early Intervention program, which currently serves 150 children aged 0 to 6 each year. At APAC, we seek to be an organization of excellence in the care of people with cerebral palsy, and to keep up-to-date with cutting-edge techniques to provide comprehensive services to all our beneficiaries.

As the Chief of Rehabilitation Medicine, I have put special emphasis on Early Detection, as I have seen first-hand the positive impact it might have in preventing or reducing long-term damage.

Ms Patricia Jimenez Torres

APAC, I.A.P. Asociación Pro Personas con Parálisis Cerebral (Association in Favor of People with Cerebral Palsy), Mexico

Conference grant (CTT03719)
AU$ $2,600.00
Implementation Of Early Detection And Intervention For Cerebral Palsy Conference

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This will be the third annual conference focusing on early detection and intervention of cerebral palsy. It includes workshops led by world renowned clinicians and researchers, and helps attendees turn theoretical knowledge into practice. The conference features debates from experts on state-of-the-art techniques and therapies.

I believe this conference will help strengthen our organization’s Detection and Early Intervention program, which currently serves 150 children aged 0 to 6 each year. At APAC, we seek to be an organization of excellence in the care of people with cerebral palsy, and to keep up-to-date with cutting-edge techniques to provide comprehensive services to all our beneficiaries.

Dr Marlies Declerck

Anton de Kom University of Suriname

Conference grant (CTT04119)
AU$ $5,000.00
Research Conference to increase knowledge and collaborations

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Following conference will be attended: “Implementation Of Early Detection And Intervention For Cerebral Palsy Conference”.

Due to my work in the Suriname CP Register, it is important to continuously increase knowledge and to be able to collaborate with specialists in the field of early detection and intervention.

A GMA training will be followed prior to the conference in pre-conference seminars.

Mr Mahmudul Hassan Al Imam

CSF Global, Bangladesh

Conference grant (CTT04719)
AU$ $4,978.00
American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) Annual Meeting 2020

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I am a Senior Research Physiotherapist from Bangladesh. I have been working with CSF Global for last two years and currently enrolled into a PhD program at the CQ University, Rockhampton, Australia under the supervision of Associate Professor Gulam Khandaker.

My clinical research is aimed to facilitate early diagnosis and intervention for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) in Bangladesh and other low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

My PhD project is aimed to develop a sustainable model of CP service delivery in rural Bangladesh through community-based participatory research. If I am offered with the scholarship, I would be able to disseminate my research findings to International forums like AACPDM and benefit by the educational and research collaboration opportunities offered by the academy.

Dr Monika Hasnat

Royal Children’s Hospital

Travel grant (CTT05019)
AU$ $5,000.00
Identifying the training needs of therapists in Bangladesh through exploration of current practice and the cultural and contextual determinants

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The Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP), in Bangladesh, provides rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy.

Learnings from a sabbatical of our colleague, highlighted the potential value of a team of Australian therapists providing training in goal directed therapy at CRP. In collaboration with the team at CRP, a qualitative research project was developed. We are requesting financial support for return flights/accommodation to Bangladesh to conduct two phases of the project.

Phase one: Jan 2020. Aim- To explore current therapy practices and gain in-depth understanding of the cultural and contextual factors influencing therapist choice of intervention and child and family goals in Bangladesh. Method- qualitative research, alongside Bangladeshi researchers, using observational and in-depth interviews.

Phase Two: Nov 2020. Implementation of training. Data collected in phase one is required to ensure that proposed training is collaborative, culturally sensitive and responsive to the real-life needs of children, families and therapists.

Dr Shiraz Badurdeen

The Royal Women’s Hospital

Travel grant (CTT05119)
AU$ $4,850.00
Newborn Resuscitation: Observation of Practice and Training

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Worldwide, 700,000 newborns die annually because they do not receive enough oxygen during birth. Many more newborns develop brain injury leading to cerebral palsy or intellectual impairment. The vast majority are born in resource-limited countries where few treatments are currently available.

During my PhD I am working on ways to improve newborn resuscitation. This includes studies on providing help breathing while still attached to the umbilical cord to maintain the lifeline of oxygen coming from the placenta. Simple improvements in the sequence of resuscitation may help improve newborn outcomes.

This grant will allow me to work with my partners in Kenya to learn about the challenges for providing high quality newborn resuscitation at 3 hospitals. I will offer training to local staff on resuscitation for full-term and preterm babies. My findings will benefit local efforts to improve resuscitation and inform future research to test new ways of preventing brain injury.

Dr Keiko Shikako-Thomas

McGill University, Canada

Travel grant (CTT05719)
AU$ $5,000.00
Tackling systems changes to promote the health of children with cerebral palsy in Canada and Australia

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The Jooay App has been developed and tested in Canada since 2015, and is now being established in Australia.

This collaborative project would enhance its development and application in Australia, would facilitate the development of research projects based on promoting community inclusion, participation in leisure and sports, and testing context-based and mobile technology use to promote the health and well-being of children with cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities.

A comparative study of Canadian accessibility legislation with the Australian Disability policy would allow for a better understanding of factors contributing to or hindering the health and well-being of children with disabilities and their families. The similarity of political systems and socio-economic factors would allow for an in-depth understanding of how environmental factors such as policies and health care and social security systems can contribute to promoting inclusion, health and the implementation of rights-based approaches for children with disabilities.

Ms Claire Nailer

Therapy Focus

Training grant (CTT05819)
AU$ $1,650.00
General Movement Assessment (GMA) Training

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The General Movements is a widely used assessment to identify neurological issues which may lead to cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities.

I would like to attend the training to more fully understand normal and abnormal infant movements, their use in diagnosis and prognosis. Compared to other states in Australia there are a smaller number of Perth based therapists who are trained in completing this assessment.

As a community based therapist I have a keen interest in ensuring that knowledge around early identification and intervention for infants with Cerebral palsy is not limited to those working in tertiary hospital settings.

Ms Robyn Heesh

The Royal Children’s Hospital

Travel grant (CTT03119)
AU$ $2,500.00
Identifying the training needs of therapists in Bangladesh through exploration of current practice and the cultural and contextual determinants

Read more

The Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP), in Bangladesh, provides rehabilitation for children with cerebral palsy. Learnings from a sabbatical of our colleague, highlighted the potential value of a team of Australian therapists providing training in goal directed therapy at CRP. In collaboration with the team at CRP, a qualitative research project was developed.

We are requesting financial support for return flights/accommodation to Bangladesh to conduct two phases of the project.

Ms Israt Jahan

CSF Global, Bangladesh

Conference grant (CTT04819)
AU$ $5,000.00
Participation at the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) 74th Annual Meeting

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The AACPDM is a global congress of multidisciplinary professionals working for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and other causes of childhood disabilities. Every year the academy provides a unique platform for new researchers and professional to acquire and share knowledge and skills in the field of prevention, causation, diagnosis, and treatment of CP and other neurodevelopmental disorder.

As an epidemiologist and public health nutritionist, I have been working with children with CP in low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs) for last three years. I am also a PhD candidate at CQ University, and my primary research is describing the epidemiology and malnutrition among children with CP in LMICs utilizing data from Global LMIC CP Register.

The conference will be a unique opportunity for me to improve my skills through interdisciplinary communication and discussion about the scientific advancements and technological innovation with the allied health care professionals concerned for childhood disability and CP globally.

Prof Christa Einspieler

KIRAN society, India

Small equipment grant (SEG00419)
AU$ $4,975.00
Early identification of children at risk for cerebral palsy in two districts of Uttar Pradesh, India

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The aim of the proposed project is to early identify infants at risk for cerebral palsy (CP) and other neurodevelopmental disorders in 54 villages near Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh, India (50,000 inhabitants; 1000 births per year, annually expected 80 infants at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders, among them three infants with a high risk for CP).

Recent guidelines for the early identification of infants at risk for CP recommend the General Movement Assessment (GMA) in combination with neonatal magnetic resonance imaging as the assessments of choice. In less privileged settings where neuroimaging is not available, observation of the infant’s early motor behaviour comes into play.

In 2017,  the University of Queensland invited the PI of this application to conduct a training course on GMA in Kolkata, India. This training was embedded in the establishment of a parent-delivered early intervention programme in West Bengal. Only a year later, more than 200 health care professionals all over India received GMA training. Among them were 40 doctors, therapists and community workers from Varanasi; G.A.N.E.S.H., General Movement Assessment in Neonates for Early Identification and Intervention, Social Support and Health Awareness (https://kiranvillage.org/?page_id=3450) was  launched.

Infants with a high risk for CP and other neurodevelopmental disorders will receive affordable paediatric and neurological care, intervention and treatment but also nutritional support (including micronutrients).

The equipment will provide the necessary hardware for GMA and its data base; as GMA and intervention is partly provided at the families’ homes, transportation aids provide accessibility to diagnosis and intervention for all infants.