Research study into optimising gym participation for young adults with cerebral palsy

Research study into optimising gym participation for young adults with cerebral palsy
Posted on Tue 27 Jul 2021

This research is being conducted by La Trobe University and CP-Achieve to learn more about what strategies may be the most important and the most practical to implement in order to optimise gym participation for young adults with cerebral palsy.

The research is open to the following groups:

  • Young adults with cerebral palsy aged 16-30 years

  • A parent, family member or guardian of a young adult with cerebral palsy aged 16-30 years

  • A health professional with experience working with people with cerebral palsy

  • Gym or recreation workers with experience working with people with physical disabilities

This research aims to bring together the views of young adults with cerebral palsy (16 - 30 years), their families, health professionals, and gym or recreation staff to develop consensus on potential future interventions.

Taking part in this research study is optional. If you decide to take part in the research we would ask that you complete 3 online surveys over a period of 6 months. Each survey would take between 20-40 minutes.

If you would like more information or are interested in being part of the research study you can:
Go to https://redcap.link/gyms4cp. follow the QR code below, or

Contact the research team:
Name: Georgia McKenzie
Email: Georgia.mckenzie@latrobe.edu.au
Phone: (03) 9479 5852

This research has been reviewed and approved by The La Trobe University Human Research Ethics
Committee.

If you have any complaints or concerns about the research study please email
humanethics@latrobe.edu.au or phone +61 3 9479 1443 quoting the following number HEC21144.

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